STROKE AWARENESS MONTH

Hey blogger friends. Most of you are aware that my disability stems from a hemorrhagic stroke I suffered back in November, 2011 secondary to a ruptured brain aneurysm. I believe I also mentioned that during brain surgery to repair the damage, I also suffered an ischemic stroke.

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Click to find out more about Stroke Month

I wanted to remind you all that May is National Stroke Awareness Month. A lot of people are under the assumption that strokes mostly happen to the elderly. That couldn’t be further from the truth!

Only 46 at the time I had mine, I’ve lost people close to me even younger. Strokes can happen to anyone, at any age – even in utero. Educate yourselves.

 

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Click here for easier to view infographic

I was lucky; I got to live. I won’t lie. It’s been no joy ride, that’s for sure. If you can lower your risk factors for stroke, do it.

Don’t go through what I’m going through, and so many others like myself are going through if you can help it.

Granted, sometimes it happens to the healthiest of people with no rhyme nor reason, and that makes this especially disturbing.

There is a lot of information out there for individuals on helping lower stroke and heart disease risk. Once you become one of ‘us’, a survivor, then there’s not so much. That’s why many of us come together and help each other figure out ways to help ourselves.

That being said, I hope you all have a great day.

 

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8 thoughts on “STROKE AWARENESS MONTH

  1. Jo Wake

    Matt had a series of TIAs which were spread over several years some time ago. Early 2000s. Luckily they never developed into anything like you suffered. Today with medications, he is doing OK although several TIAs can affect your brain. I remember meeting a young American when I was in my teens. I was on a ferry to France. He told me he had had a stroke. I was too unaware and thought he was drunk. Something I bitterly regret these days. I know what you are going through Eva and you know I’m with you every step of the way. GMD hugs.

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  2. roweeee

    So often bad luck and good luck are interwoven and it sounds like that while you are lucky to be alive, the residual effects are hard going. My brother-in-law died suddenly from an aneurism and died instantly. He was only 46 but was a heavy smoker. Still, that didn’t make it easier for the family.
    I have hydrocephalus, or fluid in the brain, which was diagnosed in my mid-twenties but I was born with it. I was very badly affected before I was given a shunt and after a few years where things were looking quite bleak, I am doing really well with minimal symptoms. That was until I had chemo and chemo brain affected the residual symptoms of the hydrocephalus but I can still ewrite well. Quite weird.
    Hope you are doing better down the track xx Rowena

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    1. My Miracle Life Post author

      Wow, Rowena, I’m so sorry to hear about your brother-in-law. The exact same thing happened to one of my former colleagues about a year after mine – same result as your brother-in-law. He was only 42.

      I’m amazed at your story, as well. We have a lot in common, even if from different things. I have a dear friend who went through something similar to you, though she wasn’t born with it. Not my story to tell, but she had to have a shunt put in years ago.

      Thanks for the visit and sharing some of your story with me. I appreciate that so much. Have a great day. Hugs, Eva

      Liked by 1 person

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